Northern hairy-nosed wombat

The Northern hairy-nosed wombat is the world biggest burrowing herbivore mammal and is exclusive to Australia. The Northern hairy-nosed wombat is listed as critically endangered because of the massive drop of population  caused by loss of habitat and the introduction of dangerous predators like Dingos. There are no more Northern hairy-nosed wombats left out in the wild and they can only be found it one conservation area in the whole of Australia (Epping Forest National Park). Sadly these wombats are still on the decline, they once inhabited Queensland and New South Wales but unfortunately there are now only 115 left in the world Рall of which as situated in the conservation park.

nhnw1 Northern hairy nosed wombat
Northern hairy-nosed wombat
Northern hairy-nosed wombat

At Epping Forest National Park where all the remaining Northern hairy-nosed wombats currently reside staff have been working hard to bring the Northern hairy-nosed wombat’s back from the brink of extinction as before the conservation act the Northern hairy-nosed wombat was down to just 35 individuals. They Northern hairy-nosed wombat’s can be found in their preferred habitat of grassland and woodlands specifically where the soil is dense and sandy because the wombats spend a large amount of time in their burrows and this type of soil is perfect for burrowing.

The Northern hairy-nosed wombat’s are the largest species of wombat in the world and are recognizable as stocky and muscular, especially their legs which are used in tandem with their claws for burrowing. The coloring of the Northern hairy-nosed wombat ranges from brown to almost silver, they have long pointed ears and the name Northern hairy-nosed wombat comes from the many fine whiskers that reside on the wombats snout. As these rare wombats are expert diggers the female wombats have adapted to this lifestyle with rear opening pouches – this prevents their pouches becoming filled with soil when burrowing.

nhnw2 Northern hairy nosed wombat
Northern hairy-nosed wombat in the day
Northern hairy-nosed wombat in the day

Most wombats are found in hot, dry climates and as such have become expert burrowers in order to shade themselves from the heat. Another way of coping with a hot dry climate is that they are nocturnal so the hotter periods of the day are avoided by sending the time in their burrow, emerging to feed at night when its cooler. The wombats dig very complex tunnels that link to multiple burrows of up to 5 wombats, these are called warrens.

In breeding season the female Northern hairy-nosed wombat’s can give birth usually to a single offspring in the wet season. The average lifespan of the Northern hairy-nosed wombat is around 23 years and the wombats will be fully independent after approximately 18 months, spending the initial 8/9 months in the mothers pouch and then following closely for another 3 – 6 months.


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